Environmental Education

Environmental education has arguably never been as important or had such a high profile as it does in today’s world of Nature Deficit Disorder. Successive studies illustrate that different learning environments and a chance to place that learning in a wider environmental context leads to happier, healthier learners with a fuller, more empathetic understanding of the natural world.

Oxfordshire has a rich history of nurturing environmental education and a dynamic diversity of groups and societies to help you get involved in learning about the environment whatever your interests or abilities. With 70 Forest Schools, 9 environmental education centres, specialist societies and groups with outreach workers, workshops, lectures and events to attend, you are sure to find support for your learning on our directory offering opportunities for both indoor and outdoor education from Early Years providers to Adult Education.

You can search for national and local organisations in our directory  to support your primary or secondary school with teaching materials. Our training pages and Environmental Bulletin list many opportunities for all ages. For specialist river education visit our Evenlode education pages.

Natural England has set up Educational Access agreements with farmers which help them host educational and care farming visits. The farm is used as outdoor learning resource to provide the opportunity to understand and experience the links between farming, conservation and food production. To search for ones in your county visit their website. 

The Countryside Classroom website has a searchable database to find more farms hosting educational visits and other outdoor learning sites in your area. Growing Schools also has links to downloadable resources for students.

The Farming and Countryside Education (FACE) website has further information and learning resources on food, farming and the countryside. FACE partners with education and industry to ensure children and young people grow up able to make informed decisions about the food they eat and the countryside it’s produced in